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Piedmont HomeHealth News

Chase Away the Winter Blues

dementiaIn the depths of winter, when the days are short and often cold and gray as well, it’s easy to feel a little glum. For the elderly, the “winter blues” can be even more common during holidays when your adult children are too busy to come for a visit or health concerns keep you at home and isolated.

5 Ways to Lift Your Spirits

If you find yourself feeling a little down, or notice you have less energy to do things you’d like to do during the day, you might be experiencing a mild case of the winter blues. There are a few things you can do to lift your spirits and make it through the dark, cold winter months.

1. Exercise. You don’t have to work up a sweat every day, but getting out for a walk when the weather is on the mild side, or signing up for a tai chi or yoga class can help get your metabolism up and your endorphins going, which help you feel better.

2. Wake up at about the same time each day. Sticking to a regular sleep schedule, even when the cold mornings make it tempting to snuggle up under the covers, can help your mood.

3. Socialize. Get together with friends, go to that bridge party, or even just pick up the phone and call a friend or family member. Interacting with others is a good way to boost your spirits.

4. Seek counseling. You don’t have to be clinically depressed to benefit from talking with a professional.

5. Enjoy time with your caregiver. Our caregivers at Piedmont HomeHealth are there to help you get the most out of life. Take a few minutes to play a few rounds of a card game or watch basketball together. Building relationships is one of the things that helps our services stand out.

Is it Winter Blues or Depression?

If you are feeling sad or depressed for two weeks or more, you might be suffering from something more than just the “winter blues.” Other symptoms of depression include:

Sleep disturbances
Lack of motivation
Fatigue
Irritability
Change in appetite: overeating or loss of appetite

If you or someone you love is suffering from these symptoms, seek medical help. You can talk with our caregivers to find resources and help in dealing with depression. Call us at 336-724-1197 to learn how we can help.